An Update on My Life

Here I am lying in my own bed in my own house on a block that overlooks downtown San Diego thinking about how God has blessed me with so many amazing materials, friends, family, and opportunity. It’s definitely crazy to think that I have my own house now that I share with 5 other guys and a car to take me around. I finally feel like an adult and I love it. I feel free because of the responsibilities I have. I love that I get to balance my education, work, and social life. I love that I’m so involved in campus and I’ve made a lot of sacrifices to make sure that these four qualities are balanced. I love the fact I sleep about 7 hours per night because I prioritize my work early on that I get that amount of sleep.  I lead a homeless ministry that takes a group of volunteers to downtown San Diego and make friends with our homeless neighbors. I’ve also taken upon the extra responsibility this semester to help one of my friends with his ministry. His ministry is visiting medically-fragile children at the Rady’s Children Hospital.

I’ve also found a job I absolutely love. I do AV (Audio/Video) stuff and IT work at my school. I get paid to go to events that I work AV at and I find it rewarding helping people doing IT work at school. I get to meet new people whenever they walk in and meet new people at events.

As you are aware, I’ve taken a hiatus from this blog the past four months and have come back to create more content. There’s something about being back in my parent’s house that makes me an absolute slop and refuse to work. A quick summary on my summer of 2017 is that I traveled around California on the weekends, worked with my church, bowled and ate out at trendy food places a lot.

As for what I’m planning on this new season, it’s going to be a lot of balancing and juggling between school, work, and friends. I want to learn more piano this year and to learn more about mixing and mastering music. The first song I taught myself was “City of Stars” from La La Land. I also want to remain physically active so I’ve picked up basketball and tried working on my handles.

I’m pretty excited for this season because of everything that’s been happening to me. This is where I am now and I hope you’ll continue to follow me on my journey through life.

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Thoughts about Finishing my Second Year of University

I’m finally finished with my second year of university. After many hours writing papers on my computer and having Kendrick Lamar’s DAMN on repeat, I’m halfway through with finishing my bachelor’s degree. My sophomore year at Point Loma Nazarene University has been crazy. From studying abroad in London in the fall of 2016 to leading volunteers for homeless ministries in San Diego and even travelling to New York City by myself. I’m pretty thankful for the experiences I’ve had within the last 8 months of school. I’ve become much more comfortable being outside my comfort zone. I’ve come to the point where I’ve become less dependent on others and dependent on God on what I want to do with my life. I’m really excited for my junior year of university because I’ll be living off-campus in a house. I personally felt tired of living on campus and being trapped within the “Loma Bubble.” I like to describe the Loma Bubble as the view that everything has to be perfect in order to please others. Stereotypically, students would make sure to look good and trendy on their social media accounts, almost as if their life is perfect. I find it ironic when I’m scrolling down my Facebook feed and I see people who “appear” awesome because they’re laughing, smiling, and having fun in their pictures yet when I meet them in person they come off as completely different. I’m not saying that they’re personalities are a complete 180 of their perceived personas, but that their personalities don’t match the way the portray themselves on social media. Another reason about why I’m excited to live off-campus is because I’ll finally own a car and I’ll be able to drive on my own. I felt trapped at Point Loma and now I feel that I can finally explore the rest of San Diego. I also didn’t give surfing too much of a chance while I was in San Diego, but now that I have a car, one of my goals is to pick it up along with hiking. There are some awesome hiking trails and deserts I want to explore. Those of which include Joshua Tree and hopefully the Grand Canyon. I’ve never hiked until I went to Point Loma where some of my upperclassmen friends invited me to some hikes. I think this is one of the few things I appreciate about the culture at Point Loma, where it sparks a sense of adventure. I think the culture at Point Loma is similar to other colleges where if you want to be considered a “Point Loman,” it (an admissions brochure had it) gives you a bunch of requirements/standards on what it means to be Loman. Such requirements/standards include: owning a Hydroflask bottle, wearing Patagonia brand clothing, being a surfer. One of my professors noted how ironic it was that this college tells you how to be Loman, yet wants to promote diversity among its students. I don’t fit much into the standards, so would I be considered as someone who is a “Point Loman?” What I do appreciate about it is the sense of fostering growth, adventure, and openness with someone who is used to being in his or her comfort zone. Despite these complaints, I’m grateful for all the relationships I’ve built there and all the experiences that developed my character at Point Loma Nazarene University.

 

 

Book Review: Elon Musk: Tesla, SpaceX and the Quest for a Fantastic Future

Elon Musk is my idol. He’s my vision of the perfect entrepreneur. He’s founded four different companies that aim to make the world a better place. This book, written by Ashlee Vance, tells the story of Elon Musk’s life, times, and works. I found this book fascinating because Vance doesn’t portray Musk as the superhero that earth deserves, but as a complex man with many strengths and weaknesses whose passion is to make the world a better place.

What I loved about this book is that it didn’t solely focused on Musk but also on the people around him. Vance sheds light on the engineers who helped Musk design the prototypes for the Tesla motors and the rockets for SpaceX. He details on the motivation for the engineers who wished to pursue building electric motors or rockets. One of Musk’s biggest criteria for both SpaceX and Tesla Motors is for them to manually build all their materials. During the finding of SpaceX, Musk hated how competitors such as Boeing spent 300 million dollars on Russian-made rockets. Musk read textbooks on how to build rockets and concluded with his co-founders that it is indeed possible to build a rocket at a much cheaper cost. Vance gives the analogy of ‘why buy a Ferrari when you can buy a Honda will do?’

As a student learning managerial and organisational communication, I found that much of what I’ve learned in these classes are applied through Musk’s form of leadership. For his organisational culture, Musk wrote an email to all his employees banning the use of new acronyms. As strange of a rule this sounds, the reason behind it is so any new engineers don’t have to learn all these new acronyms and keep everyone on the same level. He’s okay with acronyms engineers should know such as GUI, but new ones like VTS don’t make sense to him.

HIs leadership style is absolutely fascinating. Vance illustrates him both being an authoritarian leader (pretty much a dictatorship) and a democratic leader. Musk will demand his employees to do impossible tasks. If the worker refuses, Musk will fire him or her immediately and then do the task himself, which Vance has noted has followed through. Musk is known to be a callous leader as shown with an incident regarding an employee missing a press release of the first SpaceX rocket launch for the birth of his first child. “That is not an excuse!” He told him (although Vance notes Musk doesn’t recall this incident). Another example of his callousness is his disregard to the loyalty of his employees. Mary Beth Brown who has worked for him for 12 years was known to be an extension of Musk. Whenever Musk was around, she was around. She scheduled meetings for him and took him out of meetings if he was in there for too long. In 2014, she asked for a raise and Musk replies with giving her an all-expenses paid vacation and he’ll think about it. Once she came back from the vacation, she was let go because Musk “didn’t need her anymore.”

Musk is also a visionary and hopeful leader. He provides his employees with a passion to solve impossible problems and gives hope when all feels lost. His goal for SpaceX is to eventually make man become an interplanetary species. He pushed his engineers to their limits to achieve his vision. He reasons why have two engineers work 8 hours when you can have one engineer work 16 hours. There was a time where most engineers wanted to take a time off and see their families. Musk replied with “You’ll get a chance to see your family 24/7 when you’re unemployed.” That clicked with the engineers and encouraged them to work even harder. SpaceX had been doing what appears impossible compared to other space companies because they are sending a rocket every three weeks compared to every year and a half and can reuse rockets that they send up into space.

I’ve found this book applicable to me because it showcases one of the most powerful man’s leadership style. It reveals how strong he is as a leader. He is a strong leader because he has strong organisational and management skills along with the ability to understand the physics behind what he’s investing in. He may be calloused in terms of emotional quality, but I find emotional quality to be one of my strongest skills which I can use in work. He is also passionate about his impossible visions. His passion for his vision brings about passion in his employees and pushes them beyond their limits to acheive such impossible dreams. If there’s one big thing I want to take away from this book is to never stop working toward your dream because someday, that dream will become a reality.